Bottle form in 2 parts - assembled

Bottle form in 2 parts - assembled

This piece stands 3 and a half feet tall.

It is a meeting place of the monumental and the figurative and provides me with a new area of exploration.

Bottle form in 2 parts…in 2 parts.

Bottle form in 2 parts…in 2 parts.

This piece has taken on a figurative quality which I had not seen untill I began to photograph it.

The mauve tones of the inlaid clay have come from a new body, a terracotta Crank clay that I thought I would try.

Bottle form part 1.

Bottle form part 1.

This piece stands 20" tall, and is made from Crank and terracotta crank clays. The changes of tone and texture are the result of the firing technique.

Bottle form part 2

Bottle form part 2

The top of the bottle, or a singular bottle form in its own right.

These new pieces are making me think about the rules of how we define form.

Striped bottle form in 2 parts - assembled

Striped bottle form in 2 parts - assembled

This piece stands at 3 and a half feet tall. It is made from crank clay with added pumice grits.

It was fired in a large saggar or muffle which is now permanently installed in my gas kiln.

The muffle is packed with seaweed and the pot is fired on oyster shells.

Striped bottle form in 2 parts…in 2 parts

Striped bottle form in 2 parts…in 2 parts

When viewed in this configuration this piece becomes a conversation between the 2 forms.

I pot becomes 3 new pots, which can be viewed in a number of ways:

The assembled form 

Part 1, a piece in its own right

Part 2, a piece in its own right

Parts 1 & 2 in proximity

 

 

Striped bottle form part 1

Striped bottle form part 1

This piece stands 20" tall.

It carries the drama and the extremity of the firing and has a monumental and singular quality, whilst still belonging to its companion piece.

Striped bottle form part 2

Striped bottle form part 2

This piece stands at 20" tall and 17" wide. 

Dr Zeuss bottle form

Dr Zeuss bottle form

White and black stoneware clays. 3 and a half feet tall.

Saggar fired with seaweed and oyster shells. 

Dr Zeuss bottle in 2 parts. Close up.

Dr Zeuss bottle in 2 parts. Close up.

White & black stoneware clays & pumice grits. Saggar fired with Seaweed and oyster shells.

Dr Zeuss bottle form. Close up.

Dr Zeuss bottle form. Close up.

This piece has areas of sparkly red and turquoise spots. 

These are caused by small amounts of copper oxide in the clay and the reduction atmosphere of the kiln.

This effect is also known as Sang de Beouf, or oxblood, and was first used on porcelain of the Ming Dynasty…but without the pumice grits.

Red and turquoise

Red and turquoise

The red blush of copper in reduction.

Small balancing bottle form

Small balancing bottle form

Crank, black and white stoneware clays with pumice grits and oxides.

Copper reds and volcanic textures emerge as a result of the extreme firing.

14" tall.

Small balancing bottle form…another one in the series

Small balancing bottle form…another one in the series

Stoneware clays, pumice, saggar fired with seaweed and oyster shells.

14" tall.

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Large rust jar

Large rust jar

15" tall

Inspired by marks left in asphalt by road menders.

Stoneware clays, pumice and oxides.

Large rust jar

Large rust jar

The other side.

The areas of pumice can be seen influencing the texture. Seaweed leaves its mark in raised areas with a change of tone. 

Large rust jar

Large rust jar

Surface detail.

Pale areas show where the clay was masked by oyster shell in the firing.

Tall hoop jar

Tall hoop jar

21" tall. 

Inlaid stoneware clays.

Saggar fired with all the trimmings.

Cow parsley jars

Cow parsley jars

Larger jar measures 9"tall. Inlaid clays and printed slips. 

Copper red flashing and seaweed markings.

Cow Parsley jar

Cow Parsley jar

Small jar 7" tall.

Copper red flashes with printed slips.

Tea bowls

Tea bowls

Porcelain tea bowls. 3" - 4" tall.

Saggar fired with seaweed and oyster shells.

Porcelain and pumice.

3 tea bowls

3 tea bowls

Porcelain & pumice.

 

The seaweed has left its mark.

Tea bowls

Tea bowls

Porcelain, Pumice, seaweed and oyster shells.

Tea bowl at the edge

Tea bowl at the edge

Slo-mo destruction of a tea bowl caused and captured by the action of the kiln.

Tea bowl repair

Tea bowl repair

At the edge of creativity and destruction. 

Pots are hidden from view by the saggar, and therefore the 'right time' to end the firing cannot be judged by visual cues.

Temperature alone is not a sufficient measure of whether the work is complete.

This can only be judged retrospectively.

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Where the sea meets the sky...

Where the sea meets the sky...

and everything in between.

Me and my work

Me and my work

Looking North.

 

If the pot fits...

If the pot fits...

About to pick up the piece to move it Kati said

"It look's like you're in it!".

I am  not. 

I would not fit

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